CSR Champions

Corporate Social Responsibility is a management concept whereby companies integrate social and environmental concerns in their business operations and interactions with their stakeholders. As per the government’s mandate, businesses with annual revenues of more than 10bn rupees (£105m) must give away 2% of their net profit to charity. Areas they can invest this money in include education, poverty, gender equality and hunger.

We at Saral Designs understand the importance of collaboration for the greater good. We believe in leveraging available resources and utilizing it for creating a lasting impact. In the last one year, to increase our reach and improve last mile access, we have partnered with over 5 companies working towards eliminating the problems around menstrual hygiene.

Distribution of Active Ultra pads in collaboration with Precision CamShafts

Our partnership includes conducting awareness about menstrual hygiene among women and girls across all age groups, social and economic backgrounds. The awareness program is focused towards the menstrual education of girls, educating them about the biology behind menstruation and best practices which need to be followed at the time of their menstrual cycle. To properly understand the need of each school or community we select to work in, we first conduct a pre-test to see how much the women know about menstruation and the conduct a post-test to analyze the impact of the awareness session conducted by us. After each session, we distribute to girls and women free packets of ‘Active Ultra’ sanitary napkins sufficient for one cycle. A typical MHM session conducted by us covers the following topics:

  • Menstruation and body anatomy
  • Puberty and changes in body
  • What is menstruation?
  • Learningmenstrual cycle
  • Sanitation, hygiene& products
  • Hygiene practices during periods
  • Track your periods & Myth-busting
  • Right disposal practices for used pads
Students explaining the reproductive system during a session in Ghatkopar, Mumbai

We recognize our limitations as a social enterprise and know how imperative it is to partner with local NGO’s and individuals for the smooth execution of the program. In the past two years, we have developed strong partnerships with over 25 such non-profit organizations having well-built networks in the most remote parts of the country.

MHM session conducted in collaboration with Saksham Foundation

In a recent survey conducted by us to track the increase in knowledge about menstruation, health benefits and usage of hygienic menstrual products in the schools we work with, we found the following:

  • 100% of the girls went back and discussed the awareness session with either their mothers, sisters or friends
  • 82% girls used Active Ultra pads that were given to them.
  • 97% of the users found the pad quality to be excellent/good
  • Teachers from the schools observed a drastic reduction in the number of girls taking half day/ full day leaves due to period emergencies.

So far, we have :

Our Reach

But our work does not end here! There is still a long way to go and we will continue to make sanitary napkins more accessible to women, create awareness around menstruation and ensure every woman has a healthy period!

Students from a school in Chembur, Mumbai post the session with Active Ultra pads

Reaching the last mile through our Door to Door model

Menstruation is a taboo topic in India, because of which women are unaware of various menstrual hygiene products available in the market. 80% of women in India currently do not use sanitary napkins due to lack of awareness, affordability and access to quality menstrual hygiene products. This not only has an adverse health impact leading to reproductive tract infections and tetanus but also leads to workplace and school absenteeism. There is an evident need for menstrual hygiene awareness and good quality products in rural India, but there is not enough being done about it. As an organization that works in the menstrual hygiene space, we have tried multiple models with lesser cost, higher margins, fixed salaries, free samples distribution, etc. and at every step made mistakes and learned a lot from them. After spending 2 years in rural Maharashtra, we have finally arrived at a model which would work best given our vision and goals to drive change in this sector.

 This blog post aims to shed light on our Door to Door model which is very different from the models that large-scale and small-scale companies follow, because it makes sure that our product has a better reach that other companies fail to achieve, creates awareness on menstrual hygiene and health in rural areas and provides employment opportunities to women in villages. Through this model, we reach the most interior parts of our country, especially those, where a topic like menstruation, is not openly talked about.Our Door to Door model focuses on developing effective partnerships and building strong distribution systems, thereby helping us grow our sales networks and creating last mile access. We are able to do this with the help of Sanginis, who play a vital role in our program. A Sangini is a friend and guide to women in villages. She is their confidant with whom they can discuss anything about menstruation, a familiar face, a woman who will patiently listen to all your concerns, queries and provide any information you need about periods. A Sangini is also a trained village woman for sales and goes Door to Door educating people about menstruation.

We first identify Senior Sanginis, who are experienced healthcare workers and partner with them to create awareness about periods and for sale of Active Ultra sanitary napkins at the last mile. The Senior Sanginis are then provided training by our team on everything they need to know about menstrual hygiene. These Senior Sanginis select Sanginis from different villages who are appointed to go Door to Door and create awareness about periods. 

The selection of the right Senior Sangini, keeping in mind the role she plays in the community, is extremely crucial.  Senior Sanginis are usually associated with local NGOs, ASHA workers, Health officers, village Sarpanch etc. The selection criterion of a Senior Sangini for the implementation of our program broadly depends on;

Once we have identified the right Senior Sanginis, the next step is their capacity building. We do so by conducting intensive training sessions and orient them about the prevalent issues and how to create a demand for the product. Senior Sanginis and Sanginis have a set of responsibilities as mentioned below:

We provide our product directly to the Senior Sanginis reducing intermediaries, due to which each of them earns a higher margin.  With good financial incentives and a strong motivation to help other women in their localities, Sanginis proudly and effectively sell our products. Besides the profits from sales, we also incentivize them to organise sessions for awareness creation.

To ensure that we are addressing the problem from all angles, we also conduct several other activities to increase access at the last mile and to educate people about the problems surrounding menstrual hygiene.

Awareness sessions in schools/colleges: One of the best ways to reach a maximum number of girls is by approaching local schools and colleges. MHM sessions are conducted in schools and colleges to create awareness about menstrual hygiene followed by a product demo at the end of every session.

Donation Campaigns: We run a campaign called ‘That Time of the month’ in collaboration with Milaap to raise funds for girls who cannot afford sanitary pads. This campaign sponsors girls in school with six month supply of sanitary pads. Once girls start using pads from the beginning of their periods, they slowly build a habit of how to maintain good hygiene during periods and eventually become loyal customers of the product.

Awareness drives in communities: There is a continuous need to engage with the women of the village even after conducting the above-mentioned activities. 4-5 months post the campaign and door to door sales, we organize for a community level awareness session for the women and girls of the village. We train the Sanginis to conduct these awareness sessions in the villages they are from and have visited.

Door to door Sales: Sanginis visit approximately 30 women per day, ask questions, collect relevant data and in case anyone faces any problems or wants to know more about menstruation, one can discuss it freely with the Sanginis. Sanginis are also trained to talk about hygiene practices to be followed during periods and menstrual products available in the market. The Sanginis also keep a stalk of the sanitary napkins with them, therefore anytime someone needs the pads, they can directly approach the Sanginis in their village and buy it from her. 

This model has been adopted by us to increase last mile access after extensive research. Our learning’s from it have been huge and we are constantly experimenting and modifying our model given the changing times and preferences of the consumers.

We currently have a presence in 80 villages across Maharashtra and work with over 100 Sanginis in these villages. In a recent survey conducted we found that 100% Sangins that we collaborate with, take pride in spreading awareness about menstrual hygiene apart from the additional income they earn because it ensures better health of the women in their village. Our ultimate aim as a women’s health start-up is to ensure that 23% girls go back to schools, the health burden of 70% of women who suffer from reproductive tract infections is reduced and every woman has a healthy period!

“How we exported our first sanitary pad making machine to Bangladesh!”

Access to menstrual hygiene is a basic human right and the fight to provide this basic necessity to every woman is something we are working towards at Saral Designs. Availability of sanitary napkins is a huge problem in our country, especially since most good quality pads produced, are either imported or very expensive. In my experience of working in this field for 2.5 years, I have observed that the commercial manufacturing machines that make high-quality pads are high-speed, expensive (10 crore – 40 crore) and require huge marketing budgets for selling nearly 20 million pads every month. These machines which are imported from countries like China, Italy, Germany are meant for bulk manufacturing, making it difficult for small-scale businesses to sell such huge quantity of pads.

In India, most machines developed are manually operated and are unable to produce ultra thin pads. Being a part of India’s first hardware start-up that has designed a one of kind automatic sanitary napkin making machine, our aim is to create access at the last mile and set-up machines in different locations, enabling local manufacturing and distribution.

Swachh 2.0 Manufacturing Unit

To put to test this decentralization model of ours, we recently exported our first machine- Swacch 2.0 to a local entrepreneur in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Ariful Forquan identified the need of female garment workers in nearby factories which causes several women to miss work or use unhygienic materials during their periods like husk, newspapers, ragged cloth etc. As a factory owner himself,  he faced a lot of problem due to the regular absenteeism of female workers. When he delved deeper into the matter, he found out that the problem is prevalent mainly due to lack of access and availability of high-quality menstrual hygiene products in the local markets. After extensive research and meetings with many manufacturers, Ariful realized that with manually operated machines, the product quality is poor and the model cannot be scaled, while the high speed lines require very high investments to start off. The hunt for a solution to this problem, led Ariful Forquan and his business partner Dr.Kalam to meet with Saral Design’s Founders Suhani Mohan & Kartik Mehta.

saral designs team sanitary napkin machine
Ariful with Saral Designs Team

Once the deal was finalized, we vowed to provide our new Production partners with an end to end training on running a sanitary pad making business. Our operations head put together a 3-week training program for Ariful and his team where each member from Saral Designs conducted detailed sessions depending on their field of expertise. It provided a holistic experience of running a business.The training involved interactive sessions on the following topics:

  • Technical know-how: In-depth understanding of the machine, how to operate, maintain it and explanation of all manuals related.
  • Pad construction: Making and Composition of sanitary pads, quality check and control, Raw material performance.
  • Sales and distribution: Support with partnerships and proposal writing, introduction to training modules etc.
  • Design and marketing: Packaging and designing of pads, content generation for social media, marketing techniques on different platforms.
Dispatching raw materials and the machine to Dhaka.

Once Ariful and his team left, we crated the machine and prepared for its departure to Dhaka.  The task of transporting a 300 kg machine across the sea, was executed effortlessly .

However, our job was not finished here! We still had a to install the machine in Dhaka and ensure it was up and running smoothly. To help our partners understand the expected timeline to set-up a Swacch machine, we broke down the process right from finalizing the deal to beginning production into steps as shown below:

On reaching Dhaka, we immediately got to work and within two days assembled the entire machine. We started production of sanitary pads from the third day and everything else fell perfectly into place! We stayed there for 7 more days to support them with any unforeseen issue that might arise pertaining to the machine.  We left Dhaka with a feeling of accomplishment and self-assurance for having successfully completed the job at hand.

sanitary napkin making machine
Vijay installing the machine in Dhaka, Bangladesh

The set-up of our machine in Bangladesh has instilled confidence in the entire team of Saral Designs. It has reassured us that our decentralization model when implemented across the countries in need of it, will create last mile access, provide job opportunities and empower women. There is a clear and evident need for better menstrual hygiene products especially in developing countries but due to lack of access to such quality pads, the demand is not adequately met. We at Saral Designs are here to ensure this gap disappears and that every woman lives her life with dignity and confidence.

Sanitary napkin making machine
Inauguration of Sokhi Production Unit set up in collaboration with Saral Designs

 

“A great way to break a taboo is to be vocal about it and raise awareness”- by Raivat Patnana

Before I talk about my experience at Saral Designs, I’d like to tell you about myself. I hail from Visakhapatnam in Andhra Pradesh and have done my schooling in Delhi Public School, Vizag and a couple other schools. Currently, I’m in my fifth year in the dual degree program offered by the Department of Engineering Design in IIT Madras.

As a part of my academic curriculum, it was mandatory for me to pursue a six-month internship in the field of my interest. For the same, companies from various fields came to my department for interviews. Of these all, I was looking for specific companies which were offering work in the field of product design. Only a handful of these companies were offering this field of work. One such company was “Saral Designs”. As an added motivation, Saral Designs is a Social Enterprise. I have always wanted to work in a Social Enterprise to understand the kind of impact they are able to create through their work depending on the cause. All these reasons led me to take up this internship.

During the course of my internship at Saral, I’ve had a lot of technical and social learnings. I designed various mechanisms and components, sent them for manufacturing, assembled and tested the machines during my internship. Hence, I had to work through complete cycles of design processes. Though I had designed devices in the past, I had never had the opportunity to complete an entire cycle of it before. This was a learning experience; I had to look at the same product through different perceptions at different stages of the design process. In addition, I was working on an entirely new design concept for this company. This was a ripe new avenue for me to ideate and design in. My overall experience at Saral Designs has been enriching and an exciting one.

As this company is committed to improving the situation of menstrual hygiene in India, I’ve learnt quite a lot about menstrual health since my joining. Well, this is embarrassing now. Prior to my internship, I didn’t know what menstruation actually is and how it affects a woman’s body. I remember a vague description from my ninth grade biology textbook where they described the biological process of menstruation. However, I didn’t remember the “word” and there was nothing about the pain it causes, among others. It was an eye-opener for me. Periods are not something people I know openly talk about. Having worked for 6 months in a start-up that focuses on menstrual health, I find myself being more comfortable and understanding of this phenomenon.

Unfortunately, menstrual health is a “hush” topic in India. In 6 months I have become more aware of how my surrounding reacts to a taboo topic like this. Let me share an experience with you that I recently encountered. I went back to my campus for a midterm review about a month after joining the company. For the same, I had to make a presentation telling what the company was about and what my work was. Since the company was involved in the manufacturing of Sanitary Napkins, I took a pad and displayed the product to my class. At once, the entire class started murmuring among themselves, and people were staring at me and the pad in a weird way as if I had committed a crime and was publicly displaying it. It took them a while, but by the end of the day, some of them came forward and appreciated my efforts to break the taboo around this subject. My lesson from this experience: “A great way to break a taboo is to be vocal about it and raise awareness”.

 

 

 

Erasing a Taboo One Step at a Time

It wasn’t until 23 that Acumen Fellow Suhani Mohan first learned the magnitude of India’s menstrual hygiene problem. That’s because, despite being born into a highly educated family in Mumbai, Suhani hardly spoke openly about her period, let alone discussed menstruation with other women.

“Menstrual hygiene is a topic nobody really talks about in India,” she said. “For a very long time, it was something even in my family I wasn’t supposed to talk to my brother or father about. It was only a conversation between the mother and the daughter.”

Suhani isn’t alone. Across India, menstruation — although a natural part of a woman’s life — remains a deeply rooted taboo shrouded in secrecy, silence and shame. The social stigma not only stifles access to affordable, reliable products but also perpetuates India’s long history of discrimination against women. 

(Photo courtesy of Saral Designs)

Today, more than 80 million women lack access to sanitary napkins in India and roughly 200 million girls lack awareness of menstrual hygiene. As a result, they rely on makeshift, unhygienic alternatives, such as newspapers and old rags, that increase the risk of infection. In fact, around 70 percent of all reproductive diseases in India are caused by negligent menstrual hygiene. Without safe, clean options, women continue to put their health, livelihood and dignity at risk.

This was news to Suhani — until she met Dr. Anshu Gupta while volunteering through her job at Deutsche Bank. Dr. Gupta is the founder of Goonj, a social enterprise committed to breaking the myths around menstruation and providing safe solutions to low-income women. As he shared the challenges facing low-income women, Suhani felt ashamed for being completely unaware of the problem. “I never crossed my mind that when I spend 100 rupees ($1.50) a month to manage my menstruation, how a woman, whose entire family earns less than 1000 rupees ($15) a month, would manage hers,” she said.

Compelled to learn more, Suhani embarked upon a 15-day train tour across the length and breadth of India to understand life in the rural countryside. As she visited village after village, she began to realize the extent of the disparity, particularly in remote, low-income communities where access to sanitary pads was extremely limited and high-quality products were nonexistent.

Seeing the reality of the situation firsthand, Suhani began to question her path in life. Her role at Deutsche Bank was a sought-after job, but was she making a real difference? Being a volunteer was great, but was it enough? “Dr. Gupta showed me how many people were suffering,” she said. “That sense of urgency really made me see that it’s important. You can’t be in silence anymore.” She started to educate herself on all aspects of menstrual health and explore how she could use her skills and training from the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) to improve the circumstances for her fellow Indian women. 

(Suhani (right) and Kartik (centre) with the beginnings of the team that would become the social enterprise Saral Designs.)

She teamed up with Kartik Mehta, a fellow IIT alumni who studied engineering design and worked in machine design and development for companies like General Motors. Together, they researched the sanitary napkin industry to understand the existing products on the market. They discovered a gap: not only were companies producing substandard products, but they also didn’t have the means to scale and reach the women truly in need. In December of 2015, tech-savvy Suhani and Kartik began drafting a design for a machine that would automate the production of low-cost, high-quality pads and a business plan that would empower local manufacturers to scale these machines.

“While technology is making our lives easier, we believe that technology also needs to be used to address critical challenges that affect a huge segment of the population,” Suhani said.

As they developed their idea, Suhani applied to become an Acumen Fellow, hoping to learn how to turn their vision into a real, viable business. She and Kartik were having trouble getting their company off the ground, but she quickly learned she wasn’t alone. As a Fellow, she found a community of like-minded individuals who helped her think through her business model and break down the complexity of the problems she wanted to solve. “The Acumen Fellowship gave me another lens to look at problems, the adaptive lens, as we call it,” she said. “If I am part of the problem too, I will not be able to solve it…that lens has helped me a lot.”

Image Courtesy Saral Designs
Photo courtesy of Saral Designs

 By June 2015, Suhani and Kartik had quit their jobs and founded Saral Designs, a social enterprise that provides access to quality, cost-effective menstrual hygiene solutions and helps women embrace their womanhood with dignity. Their machine had been built, their new and improved pad designed; they were open for business. Now all they had to find were customers.

At first, Suhani turned to her friends and family to test out the product but, trying to be supportive, they failed to give her real, critical feedback. So Suhani, along with the other women on Saral’s team, ventured into Mumbai’s slums to see if they could find low-income women — the customers they ultimately wanted to serve — willing to try Saral’s pads. At first, they didn’t get very far but eventually, a few women opened up to them.

“Since the topic is so taboo, they would call us inside their houses,” Suhani said. “Once you get inside their safe space, we would sit down and have a conversation, woman to woman. What really worked was that we were talking the same language as them, and we were making them feel that their voice is really really important. That doesn’t happen in those communities.”

Of the 15 women they met that day, 14 of them purchased a Saral napkin. These women were instrumental in helping Suhani and Kartik fine-tune their super thin, highly absorptive Active Ultra pads. A few of them even became Saral brand ambassadors, helping to secure new customers and distribute pads throughout the slums. Today, Saral Designs has sold more than a million pads, using every channel from door-to-door sales to Amazon. The company has also partnered with schools across Mumbai to install vending machines and raise awareness among adolescent girls. In India, 113 million girls, ages 12 to 14, are at risk of dropping out of school due to the stigma of menstruation.

(Through Saral Designs, Suhani, bottom right, is working to raise awareness of menstrual hygiene for Indian women and girls and stop the stigma around menstruation.)

For Suhani, this is only the start. Now 26, she is looking to find more effective distribution channels to reach the millions of women without access to high-quality hygiene solutions, like those she met on her journey across rural India. She also wants to see if Saral Designs can replicate its model of distributed manufacturing for other essential consumer products.

“Entrepreneurship is a marathon,” Suhani said. “It’s not a sprint. It may happen that you get acquired and you’re out of it in five years but, when you start, that should never be the motivation. We are working toward a future where women will have access to a variety of services and products for their health and hygiene at a price they can afford.

The unnecessary shyness and stigma around natural biological processes like menstruation, puberty, sexuality and defecation need to end. When we start talking about these topics openly, innovations in these sectors will happen at a much greater rate.”

(This article was first published on Acumen Ideas) 

Saral Open House

On 26th August, we hosted our very first ‘ Saral Open House ‘ for those interested in getting to know what we do, a little bit more.

We are so grateful to all those who attended the event and to those who supported us throughout.

We truly appreciate all of you out there!

Here are a few glimpses of the successful  Open House event at Saral Designs. We hope you enjoy them and share your thoughts about it with us.

A full house at Saral Open House
A full house at Saral Open House
Our CTO during his session on the manufacturing unit
Our CTO – Kartik Mehta during his session on the manufacturing unit
During the tour of the production area
Vijay Prakash  with the guests during the tour of the production area
A happy team member during the sales session
Kalyani Joshi our Sales lead during the sales session
The guests blowing away their troubles during the balloon activity
The guests blowing away their troubles during the balloon activity
During our favorite balloon game with the guests at the Saral Open House
During our favourite balloon game with the guests at the Saral Open House
Our guests checking in at the Saral Open House
Our guests checking in at the Saral Open House
Suhani Mohan with the Founder of Red is the New Green at the Saral Open House
Suhani Mohan with the Founder of Red is the New Green at the Saral Open House
A happy Saral Team , enjoying the success of the event
A happy Saral Team, enjoying the success post the event

How we sold our first million pads

Here’s a story of how we sold more than 1 million sanitary napkins in a span of 12 months reaching out to more than 1 Lakh rural women across Maharashtra, Karnataka, Chhattisgarh, Manipur and many more. With the innovation in the product, production and local distribution we provide access to high quality ultra-thin sanitary napkins at an affordable price in these villages, through Sanginis, a group of women healthcare workers.

1 million

Founded in 2015, we commenced our operations in 2016 and have designed the world’s first compact, modular and automatic machine named ‘SWACHH’ that makes ultra-thin sanitary napkins. The automation reduces human errors and keeps the production rate high, to ~ 15,000 pads per day, while also reducing the cost of production. Further, the decentralized production enables a reduction in distribution cost by almost 30% leading to an overall price reduction.

Suhani Mohan, Co-founder and CEO, Saral Designs said “We are delighted to achieve this milestone in a short span of time. At Saral Designs, we believe that menstrual hygiene is the right of every Indian woman and we are committed to providing that last mile accessibility to high-quality pads. While innovation in technology and decentralized distribution have made the pad affordable by almost 50% as compared to a global brand, the percentage of first-time users of pads and our repeat buyers reaffirm the quality of our product. However, a vast majority of Indian women are still using unhygienic modes during their menstruation period. From our own survey in rural areas, we found a lack of awareness of hygiene, lack of accessibility and lack of affordability among the primary reasons discouraging rural women to switch to using sanitary pads.Hence, we are investing in awareness programs to address social challenges including taboo around menstruating women.”

Sapna Marade, a happy consumer and repeat buyer of Active Ultra from Kadav, Karjat says-I hardly go to the town as I feel shy asking my family members to get pads for me. Hence, I had to use cloth. Now that Sangini didi sells pads in our village, it is very convenient for me. Now, I use Active Ultra pads only. I like the quality of pads too”.  

Happy Customers of Active
Happy Customers of Active

As a part of our school intervention program, we also installed vending machines across 14 low- income schools across many villages in Maharashtra. We recently put to test our delivery model to measure its impact by conducting a survey across 60 villages and observed the following outcomes:

  • 52% of the total users of our product were cloth rag users before.
  • 3% of buyers feel that easy accessibility at the last mile has led to using them pads regularly.
  • 88% of the users who switched from other brands believe the product quality was much better. Remaining find it on par with the products they used before.
  • For our healthcare workers (Sanginis), apart from the added income, they said that they take pride in selling our pads and spreading awareness about menstrual hygiene.

Our learnings from this survey have been that increased access, coupled with a high-quality affordable product has enabled multiple women to make the switch towards hygienic menstrual hygiene solutions.

Reaching the ‘1 million’ target has been one of our biggest achievements. It reinforces our belief that we are heading in the right direction towards formidable change. This year we also reached out to people who are in genuine need of hygienic menstrual products, fostered strong partnerships and have had experiences that make this journey so much more meaningful. We are truly grateful and humbled by all the support and love we continue to receive.

Team Photo

(P.S To learn more about the survey, you can read our blog post – Health Impact Monitoring System which is a detailed and well – researched survey on our door to door delivery model.)

Health Impact Monitoring System

Health Impact Monitoring System

At Saral Designs, we constantly put to test our interventions and measure its impact on various communities. Our aim is to design a better future in menstrual hygiene via our decentralized production and unconventional distribution mechanisms. Through our initiative, we have sold more than 1 million pads in less than 1 year and have a presence in towns and villages of Maharashtra, Karnataka, Chhattisgarh and Manipur in India, Bangladesh and Dubai. This Survey has been researched extensively in an attempt to make available all our findings for everyone’s use.

Of the various mechanisms for increasing last mile access, we have been working on creating a sustainable channel for door to door distribution of pads in villages of India. This study is to understand the key objectives and measure outcomes and impact of this delivery model.

YOYOYO

The survey was conducted by Sanginis who are trained village women for sales and awareness creation. They have a thorough knowledge of geography and members of the village, basic literacy up to class 10 and are comfortable travelling in the village and to the training centre when required.

The objective of the monitoring system is to provide continuous data to track the increase in knowledge about menstruation and health benefits and usage of hygienic menstrual products. The program will measure and track the awareness, intention to use, reported usage data and health seeking behaviour.

Of the 60 villages (a total menstruating population of ~25,000 women) we have a presence in,(via our door to door health workers -Sanginis), we interviewed 100 women. The sample size is ~0.4% of the total target population.

YOYOYOYO

The sample size has been arrived at on the following considerations:

  1. The chances of the program having different responses for different villages
  2. The sample size should be sufficient enough to provide an estimate of product usage and awareness for the total target women

Survey Mechanism

  1. Out of 60 villages in Raigad district of Maharashtra where the program is active, we selected 5 villages to do the survey(Kadav, Kalamb, Neral, Pali and Wadwali).
  2. 5 villages were chosen so as to include regions with the strongest sales and the worst product sales to get a balanced perspective and range of feedback.
  3. The survey questionnaire and data was collected from the users and Sanginis of the village.
  4. It approximately took a month to complete one round of data collection.

Analysis of the Survey:

YOYO

YOYO2

 Post our intervention in these villages we found that, there were 0.01% respondents who continued to use unhygienic cloth rags, 0.04% were using a pad for incorrectly (for Eg. Using the pad for more than 10 hours a day). 100 % of the Sanginis said that apart from the additional income, they take pride in spreading awareness about menstrual hygiene which ensures better health of their village women.

From this survey and our interventions, we have found that increased access, coupled with a high-quality affordable product has enabled multiple women to make the switch towards hygienic menstrual solutions.

However, our work does not stop here as there is still a need to continue and strengthen the MHM awareness programs to ensure 100% hygienic and proper usage of sanitary napkins.

 

For maximum impact, listen more and speak less – By Anchal Srivastava

Every story, each poem that a person shares, each voice that speaks about menstrual taboo, inspires me and brings me closer to breaking this taboo…

I belong to a business class family from Lucknow (U.P.) and am currently pursuing my M.B.A from Banasthali University, Rajasthan. A few years ago, I realized the urgent need to tackle the problem of menstrual hygiene, when my mother suffered from ovarian cancer in 2012 due to an infection in her vagina because of fluctuation in her menstrual cycle. This made her suffer a lot for 2 years. But she came out stronger from this and recovered completely. It’s not just the story of my mother but, the story of millions of other women in India suffering from the same cause. These reasons drew me to this topic and I wanted to bring about a change in menstrual hygiene management; as it’s a matter of dignity for every woman.

Thus, began my journey in this field. I worked on creating awareness regarding menstrual hygiene with rural women of Rajasthan during my first year of MBA. As a part of my MBA curriculum, I have been interning with Saral Designs, a product driven start-up focusing on designing a better future for menstrual hygiene management by producing sanitary pads of high quality at an affordable price. At Saral, my learnings have only doubled as I have been exposed to the problems at the grass root level. Every day is a learning experience for me and my colleagues play a vital role in this journey.The team at Saral is very dedicated and passionate about the issue and work very hard towards improving the state of menstrual hygiene in India. I work across various parts of Maharashtra to understand the prevalent situation of women on their periods.

Recently I conducted an event on menstrual hygiene day at YTM College of Management and Dental Science, Navi Mumbai. The objective of the event was to create awareness and bust various myths on menstruation. I sat at a corner in the auditorium with over 100 students, patiently observing the crowd and scanning my audience. The students sat quietly with no participation from their side. Even though the students were from a medical background, there was no active participation from their end. They were shy and very uncomfortable to open up about the topic of periods. In the meantime, I was making a mental note of the various activities I can conduct to get active participation from the crowd.  As soon as I went to the podium, I started with an ice breaking game and a video which instantly got the crowd on their feet. I talked about the superstitions behind myths, scientific facts about menstruation and tried to bring light to the misconceptions people have about periods. Apart from creating awareness about menstruation, I spoke about the sanitary pads we, at Saral Designs make – Active Ultra and also distributed a few free samples of Active Ultra to the crowd. The moment I left the stage, people clapped and hooted loudly, that’s when I realized the event was a success.

I was happy that I could inspire the crowd to engage in a discussion on menstruation. I take back this great experience, knowledge from other speakers as a valuable learning in my bag. This is what Saral gave me in just half a month. I look forward to the rest of the  5 ½ months to go with Saral; to learn, to experience and delve much deeper into the world of menstruation and break the taboo!

Taxing periods in India — the old & the new way

We all know that sanitary napkins are going to be taxed at 12 % GST. But, many of us are still unsure of its implications as a consumer and manufacturer. 
As most discussions currently revolve around the impact of GST on sanitary napkins and why sanitary napkins should be made free, we have our very own Suhani Mohan breaking it down for us in a lay man’s term.
#taxfreeperiods #lahukalagaan #healthfirst
Read more to find out.